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Video of Global Landscapes Forum Event on Gender and Climate Change

Bangladesh_photoWatch this discussion forum on "Gender and resilience across the landscape – from Latin America, Africa and Asia" which took place on December 6, 2014, the first day of the Global Landscapes Forum, in Lima, Peru, during COP20. Gender concerns are gaining increasing recognition in climate change negotiations. Although women are believed to be more vulnerable to climate change, data on this issue are scarce. Drawing on research on resilience of men and women in four different landscapes (the Peruvian and Bolivian Altiplano; the Ethiopian Highlands; the Kenyan ASALs; and Bangladesh’s lowlands), watch this discussion on the disparities in men’s and women’s access to and control over key assets needed to cope with climatic shocks and adapt to long-term change.

 

Click here to watch the video.

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Op-ed by Claudia Ringler on climate change and rural women in Outreach magazine

Roadside market in EthiopiaCOP 20: Climate Change Negotiators Must Consider the Role of Rural Women

By Claudia Ringler, Deputy Division Director, IFPRI

As smallholder farmers in many parts of the world, women play a crucial role in food production. Yet they are the least equipped to adapt their farming practices to climate change. The reason? They have less access and control than men over key assets, such as capital, agricultural information and training, farm inputs, and other resources related to agricultural production. This week, as world leaders gather in Peru to participate in the climate change negotiations, it is imperative that we turn our attention to rural women and focus on policies that increase their ability to cope with climate change.

Click here to access the full article.

 

Interview on gender and climate change with Ruth Meinzen-Dick

MeinzenDick_Ruth_0Following up on the themes discussed at the COP side event in Lima, Peru, Ruth Meinzen-Dick, Senior Research Fellow at IFPRI, discusses women farmers’ abilities to adapt to climate change, highlighting the importance of access to climate change information in rural farming communities in Africa. The interview was conducted by Laura Angela Bagnetto at Resources for the Future.

Listen to the interview here.

 

Summary of the IFPRI-hosted side event at the COP in Lima available

Wednesday, December 3, panelIFPRI hosted an official COP20 side event on "Increasing the Resilience of Farming Communities to Climate Change through Shared Learning and Adaptation Decision-Making with a Focus on Gender." The event was co-hosted with the Asociación para la Naturaleza y Desarrollo Sostenible (ANDES) and organized with the University of Missouri.

Click here to read a summary of the event

Click here to access the video which highlights the key messages from the event.

New set of policy notes now available!

A neclimategenderpolicynotew volume of policy notes summarizes the findings from the project "Enhancing Women's Assets to Manage Risk under Climate Change: Potential for Group-Based Approaches." The notes in this collection explore how to protect or strengthen women’s control over critical assets, including natural resources and social capital. These notes also examine the potential for innovative and group-based approaches to increase women’s assets and strengthen their risk-management capabilities in the context of climate change.

Click here to download the full set.

Plusieurs des notes d'orientation sont également disponibles en français :

Genre et changement climatique: pour une approche de l’adaptation communautaire fondée sur le groupe

Diffusion des technologies agricoles via les réseaux sociaux: l’exemple du compostage au Mali

Impact sexospécifique de la variabilité climatique sur les possibilités de production: l’exemple de la production céréalière au Mali

Presentation on Gender, Collective Action, and Climate Change now available!

BMZ_presentationNovember 20, 2014

A new presentation on Gender, Collective Action, and Climate Change is now available here.

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IFPRI Side Event at COP 20 – Wednesday, 03 Dec 2014, 16:45–18:15 Sipan Room

November 20, 201COP20-170x1704

INCREASING the RESILIENCE of FARMING COMMUNITIES to CLIMATE CHANGE through Shared Learning and Adaptation Decision-Making with a Focus on Gender

WHEN: Wednesday, 03 Dec 2014, 16:45–18:15

WHERE: Sipan Room, COP 20 Venue: Cuartel General del Ejército del Perú (CGEP) Av. Boulevar S/N,
San Borja Lima 41 Surco, Lima, Peru

IFPRI Side Event Flyer

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Discussion paper on “Land rights knowledge and conservation in rural Ethiopia: Mind the gender gap” now available

A new IFPRI Discussion Paper by Agnes Quisumbing and Neha Kumar examines the medium-term impact of the land registration on investment behavior by households, particularly the adoption of soil conservation techniques and tree planting. It investigates whether men’s and women’s knowledge of their property rights under the land registration (as measured by answers to a list of questions regarding the provisions of the registration, covering such areas as tenure security, land transfer rights, and rights related to gender equity and inheritance) has an impact on these investments.

Access the Discussion Paper here

Why rural women are integral in the upcoming climate change negotiations

On the UN International Day of Rural Women, Claudia Ringler discusses why rural women are integral in the upcoming climate change negotiations. Read the blog here

New discussion paper available: “The impact of shocks on gender-differentiated asset dynamics in Bangladesh”

Assets are an important means of coping with adverse events in developing countries but the role of gendered ownership is not yet fully understood. This paper, by Muntaha Rakib and Julia Anna Matz, investigates changes in assets owned by the household head, his spouse, or jointly by both of them in response to shocks in rural agricultural households in Bangladesh with the help of detailed household survey panel data. Land is owned mostly by men, who are wealthier than their spouses with respect to almost all types of assets, but relative ownership varies by type of asset. Controlling for unobserved heterogeneity across households and looking at changes within, rather than between, households, we find that weather shocks such as cyclones adversely affect the asset holdings of household heads in general, while predicted external events lead to assets of both spouses being drawn down. The results, furthermore, suggest that jointly owned assets are not sold in response to shocks, either due to these assets being actively protected or due to the difficulty of agreeing on this coping strategy, and that women’s asset holdings and associated coping strategies are shaped by their lower involvement in agriculture.

Click here to download the paper